No Pull Dog Harness – How to Teach Dog to Stop Pulling on Leash

Leash pulling is probably one of the biggest problems dog owners have, sometimes making walks seem impossible.

This is unfortunate since many dogs are overweight due to a lack of exercise.

Thankfully, we now have many different types of dog harnesses that discourage pulling, making training much easier!

Quick Links to Our Picks

  1. No-Choke No-Pull Front-Leading Dog Harness
  2. Freedom No Pull Pet Harness
  3. HDP Big Dog Soft
  4. RABBITGOO
  5. Eagloo with Front Clip
  6. ICEFANG Tactical Pet Harness

*The above links lead to current prices and customer reviews.

How to Choose the Best No Pull Dog Harness

Product Reviews

Questions & Answers

How to Choose the Best No Pull Dog Harness

Harnesses today come in many different shapes and sizes, the best designed to serve a certain function more than others. For example, not all harnesses are ‘no-pull’ harnesses; some just fit like clothing. If you are looking for a ‘no pull’ harness, you want something that specifically discourages pulling. To be more specific, you are looking for 4-6 key points:

  • Actively discourages pulling
  • Made from durable, padded material
  • Guaranteed to last or manufacturer will replace
  • Area for identification tags
  • Adjustable straps to allow for growth
  • Reflective material for safety

Product Reviews

No-Choke No-Pull Front-Leading Dog Harness skip to review

Freedom No Pull Pet Harness skip to review

HDP Big Dog Soft skip to review

RABBITGOO skip to review

Eagloo with Front Clip skip to review

ICEFANG Tactical Pet Harness skip to review

No-Choke No-Pull Front-Leading Dog Harness

A ‘simpler’ harness, this fantastic tool is available in several different colors and sizes. Not only does it offer a ‘gentler’ form of correction, acting to ‘turn’ the dog toward the leash when he pulls, but it also doesn’t apply any pressure on his/her delicate trachea.

Reflective material creating this no pull dog harness allows your dog to be seen from 300 meters away, especially effective at night. The simplistic design of the No-Choke No-Pull Front-Leading Dog Harness doesn’t take much time to figure out, and is recommended by trainers & dog walkers alike! To give you even more confidence, you’re offered a 100% satisfaction guarantee by the manufacturer.

Pros:

  • Reflective material
  • Designed to discourage pilling

Cons:

  • Simple straps provide little coverage

Check Price & Availability & Buyers Reviews


Freedom No Pull Pet Harness

Like the harness above, the Freedom No Pull Dog Harness discourages pulling by causing the dog to ‘turn’ in the direction of the lead, but doesn’t actually rest on the neck and thus eliminates neck strain at the same time. Easy to use, comfortable and durable, a soft Swiss velvet lining helps prevent rubbing behind the legs.

This no pull dog harness is multifunctional with two separate leash attachments, able to be used for simple exercise on top of its main function. A double-ended leash comes included, which can be attached to either the front or back of the harness.

To top it all off, you are even given a lifetime chewing warranty! The manufacturer will gladly replace up to two chewn straps free of charge.

Pros:

  • Reflective material
  • Designed to discourage pilling
  • Two leash connections; belly and back
  • Velvet inner lining prevents chafing

Cons:

  • Simple straps provide little coverage

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HDP Big Dog Soft

Offering easy click buckles and material that covers more of a surface area, the HDP Big Dog Soft No Pull Harness offers extra padding, comes in six different colors with four separate sizes, and the front strap sits lower on the chest, avoiding any pressure on the neck. This harness even comes with a handle for convenience, in case you need to lift your dog!

Pros:

  • Very easy to apply
  • A colorful, padded area on the back for easy viewing
  • Strap for lifting
  • Reflective strip on the back

Cons:

  • Two simple straps provide little coverage on the chest and belly

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RABBITGOO Dog Harness No-Pull Pet Harness

Another padded harness, this is much more than simple straps. Not only does an easy, but simplistic yet durable design also makes putting this no-pull harness on your dog so simple a child could do it, two sturdy attachment rings with slide straps provide an adjustable system and customizable fit.

If all this weren’t enough, reflective side straps create a safe walking environment and make your pet easier to see at night!

Pros:

  • Padded, cushioned area on both chest and back
  • Reflective strips around the harness
  • Adjustable system
  • Example video provided

Cons:

  • Fabric straps can wear over time

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Eagloo No Pull Dog Harness with Front Clip

Another fantastic, colorful padded body harness, the Eagloo No Pull Dog Harness with Front Clip offers durable nylon webbing with 3M reflective, breathable material for added safety at night and better design control. Two zinc-alloy rings on both the chest and back give you the option to switch between ‘pulling correction- chest’ and ‘control-back’. Five different sizes are enough to fit any breed.

Along with all this, you are of course given a 100% quality guarantee! Any quality-related issues will be taken care of with either a complete replacement or a full refund, so you have nothing to lose with this fantastic harness!

Pros:

  • Padded, breathable surfaces on chest and back
  • Four adjustable buckles
  • Reflective strips

Cons:

  • Fabric straps can wear over time

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ICEFANG Tactical Dog Harness

As far as harnesses go, this guy might as well be the king. If you’ve ever served in the military or with law enforcement, you are very familiar with this material! Not only does the ICEFANG Tactical Dog Harness provide a chest clip as well as a back to discourage pulling, but it also does much more!

Several different velcro straps provide plenty of areas to place labels, like your dog’s name, breed, whether he should be approached or not, etc. Simple clips make this very easy to put on, and metal alloy buckles (not plastic, like every other here) at the shoulder positions promise up to a 1000 pound test; no dog is going to break through these. Both three different sizes and three different colors promise a fit for almost any medium to giant breed!

Pros:

  • King of dog harnesses
  • Velcro straps for labeling
  • Very simple to apply
  • Front buckles made of metal alloy
  • Plastic buckles 250 pounds proof, metal alloy 1000 pound proof

Cons:

  • No reflective material unless purchased separately

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Questions & Answers

1. How does a harness stop a dog from pulling?

This really depends on the design and function of the harness. Many harnesses today will cause the dog to ‘turn’ in the direction of the lead, an uncomfortable detriment. Head halter type designers cause the dog’s head, and thus whole body, to turn when pulled, which is uncomfortable for the dog and discourages pulling.

The best harnesses, these included, don’t cause any actual ‘pain’, but only slight discomfort meant to discourage.

2. What do dog trainers say is best no pull harness (for small and large dogs)?

This depends on the type of trainer and situation; all dogs are different and some might have extraordinary problems to overcome, while others are easier to train.

Small Breeds

For small breeds, you absolutely want to avoid anything that applies pressure to the neck or tranchia, or anything that tightens. Control isn’t going to present the same problem it does in large, powerful breeds, so a simple body harness is usually enough.

Large Breeds

Again, it’s best to avoid anything that applies pressure to the neck. There isn’t really a ‘best harness’- it depends on the situation and dog. A body harness, like the HDP Big Dog Soft No Pull Harness above works well, or you might choose to go with a head halter, for example.

3. What kind of harness is best for a dog that pulls?

This depends on the breed, size and how difficult the dog is to control, but you probably want to consider a harness that ‘redirects’ the dog toward the leash, like some of the ones above. Head halters work well to discourage pulling, as long as you can train the dog to allow it. The answer here is more about what to avoid. Try to avoid anything that tightens around the neck or applies pressure to the neck when pulling. Prong collars especially can create a danger for powerful pullers if not worn correctly.

4. Can you leave a harness on a dog all day?

Sometimes; it all depends on the dog. Some dogs not used to harnesses may try and chew their harness off, while others would be completely content wearing their new ‘clothes’.

There is really no common safety related issue preventing you from leaving the harness on all day. However, if you want your pet to associate it with walking, it’s best to put it on and take it off around walking times.

So the full answer here? Sure, you can leave your harness on all day, but it’s recommended to take it off puppies for their likelihood to chew.

5. How do I get my puppy to stop pulling on the leash?

Depending on his/her size, you want to be extra careful with puppies. These no-pull harnesses work well, but puppies (depending on the age) will still need to be trained.

6. Are harnesses (leashes) safe for dogs?

Harnesses, especially reflective, padded body harnesses, are usually much safer than normal collars since they are both easier to see from a distance and don’t tighten/press down on the dog’s trachea. Harnesses are especially safer for smaller/toy breeds or puppies.

7. Can you hurt your dog by pulling on the leash?

Damage or injury to the neck and trachea is the biggest problem associated with dogs that pull on their collars or leashes. This also does nothing to help the training process.

8. Is a harness better than a collar for a dog that pulls?

Yes, it certainly is, and for more than one reason! The right kind of harness will ‘redirect’ your dog’s attention & momentum, causing him to turn in the direction of the lead. In this way, pulling actually causes the dog to go backwards, away from what he is trying to get to. Eventually, your dog will learn that pulling only halts the walk and gets him nowhere.

The second reason, and perhaps the more important one- you are taking pressure off your dog’s neck and trachea. Many are reflective to boot, adding extra safety, and body harnesses add extra control.